mUSLIM BABY NAMES | NAMA ISLAM BAYI

Why Children Should Know The Importance of Saying Salam

Teaching your child the importance of saying assalamu’alaikum will help them learn to get to know and acknowledge people.  But in our society today, people aren’t saying, “assalamu’alaikum” anymore.

Today, more than ever, everywhere you look or read there is something about the “danger with strangers.”  It’s taught to your child in school, it’s preached in churches, and parenting classes.  But, are we instilling fear into our children rather than promoting confidence.  And, at the same time are we instilling fear into ourselves as parents and turning into a society of becoming fearful of knowing each other?

What’s the end-result?  The neighborhood block parties are disappearing and our children play with video games instead of playing with their friends a few blocks away.  Have you ever noticed if you go out and just say, “Assalamu’alaikum” to people you get some very strange looks?  Some people actually turn their heads. How many best friends does your child have today?  Do you remember how many classmates you knew growing up?

How can we take this fear, turn the fear into confidence, and at the same time teach our children the importance of getting to know and acknowledge people?

Over the years my children and I developed and played a game and it’s called “Who Knows The Most People.”  We played the game every time we went out … to the grocery store … the zoo … the park … walking, just about any place we went, we played the game.

Here’s how the game works.  The challenge: “Who Will Know The First Person You See.” Start by pointing out to your children the why/how you know someone.  Whether at the grocery store, restaurant or other place, someone is always there assisting or serving you. You say, “Assalamu’alaikum” and explain who this person is and how you know them.  It could be a parent of one of their friends.  Your children will catch on and they will want to be saying, “assalamu’alaikum” first.  You’ll find that your children don’t like losing the game if you are the first to say, “assalamu’alaikum,”  most of the time.

By setting an example and teaching the value of saying, “assalamu’alaikum” will help your children throughout their lives. It’s up to you, the parent. Getting your child to know the people who they meet every day, and treating them as if they truly matter in the big scheme of things. Saying assalamu’alaikum builds the foundation for your child to learn how to welcome people, old and new.

You can start with just a few things and then build upon them: Challenge your children to know the names of all the kids in their class and what grade they’re in. Take the time to wave to your neighbors as you ride your bike, walk the neighborhood, or drive off to the grocery store.  Set the example and teach the value of “Assalamu’alaikum.”

Teaching your child the importance of saying assalamu’alaikum will help them learn to get to know and acknowledge people.  But in our society today, people aren’t saying, “assalamu’alaikum” anymore.
Today, more than ever, everywhere you look or read there is something about the “danger with strangers.”  It’s taught to your child in school, it’s preached in churches, and parenting classes.  But, are we instilling fear into our children rather than promoting confidence.  And, at the same time are we instilling fear into ourselves as parents and turning into a society of becoming fearful of knowing each other?

What’s the end-result?  The neighborhood block parties are disappearing and our children play with video games instead of playing with their friends a few blocks away.  Have you ever noticed if you go out and just say, “Assalamu’alaikum” to people you get some very strange looks?  Some people actually turn their heads. How many best friends does your child have today?  Do you remember how many classmates you knew growing up?

How can we take this fear, turn the fear into confidence, and at the same time teach our children the importance of getting to know and acknowledge people?
Over the years my children and I developed and played a game and it’s called “Who Knows The Most People.”  We played the game every time we went out … to the grocery store … the zoo … the park … walking, just about any place we went, we played the game.

Here’s how the game works.  The challenge: “Who Will Know The First Person You See.” Start by pointing out to your children the why/how you know someone.  Whether at the grocery store, restaurant or other place, someone is always there assisting or serving you. You say, “Assalamu’alaikum” and explain who this person is and how you know them.  It could be a parent of one of their friends.  Your children will catch on and they will want to be saying, “assalamu’alaikum” first.  You’ll find that your children don’t like losing the game if you are the first to say, “assalamu’alaikum,”  most of the time.

By setting an example and teaching the value of saying, “assalamu’alaikum” will help your children throughout their lives. It’s up to you, the parent. Getting your child to know the people who they meet every day, and treating them as if they truly matter in the big scheme of things. Saying assalamu’alaikum builds the foundation for your child to learn how to welcome people, old and new.

You can start with just a few things and then build upon them: Challenge your children to know the names of all the kids in their class and what grade they’re in. Take the time to wave to your neighbors as you ride your bike, walk the neighborhood, or drive off to the grocery store.  Set the example and teach the value of “Assalamu’alaikum.”

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